Spread Warmth this Winter with Coats for the Cold

Four young girls bundled up in winter coats drinking hot chocolate.

The warmth of your generosity could help those less-fortunate this winter. The Oakland County Sheriff’s Office is accepting donations of new or clean, used coats through November 30th as part of their 30th annual “Coats for the Cold” coat drive.

Donated coats will be sent to a variety of local charitable organizations, who in turn distribute the coats to community members most in need.

“Coats for the Cold is an easy way for the community to reach out and help someone less fortunate stay warm this winter,” Sheriff Michael J. Bouchard said. “For the past 29 years, we have worked with local charitable organizations to provide free coats to those in need. The community’s generosity has been wonderful every year.”

Spotlight | Coats for the Cold Drop-Off Sites

This year’s coat drive is sponsored by the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office in partnership with 1-800-Self-Storage.com, COWS (Container on Wheels Mobile Storage), Real Estate One, Genisys Credit Union, Amp97 Detroit, and several other Oakland County charitable organizations.

As a special promotion this year, coat donors will receive $10 off of the cost of a pet adoption at the Oakland County Pet Adoption Center for each of the first five coats donated (limit $50).

If you’d like to know more about Coats for the Cold and other Community Outreach Initiatives of the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, visit their website, like them on Facebook, or follow them on Twitter.


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Giving Back With Operation Good Cheer

Still8

Thank you for your interest in Operation Good Cheer. For the Oakland County Blog’s latest edition of Operation Good Cheer, see here.

Operation Good Cheer was started in 1971 by Child & Family Services of Michigan, Inc. to make a difference in the lives of children who reside in foster care. The program is entirely volunteer based with donor groups and individuals generously giving their time and money to purchasing, wrapping and transporting gifts across the state. Through the years the program has provided more than 87,000 children and youth gifts for Christmas. Continue reading

Coats for the Cold Program

In its 29th year, the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office is collecting coats for its “Coats for the Cold” drive through November 30th at over 60 Oakland County locations. The coat drive is sponsored by the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, in partnership with 1-800-MINI-STORAGE, COWS (Container on Wheels Mobile Storage), Real Estate One, Genisys Credit Union89X Detroit, 101 WRIF Detroit, and many other community organizations around Oakland County. 1-800-MINI-STORAGE, is providing the boxes for coat drop-off sites around the county, and COWS is providing their portable storage units at several drop-off sites as well.

Every year the coats are distributed to local organizations that help those in need, allowing for donations to directly impact those in the area. Click here to find a drop-off location near you.

Visit the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office website for more information, or follow them on Facebook.

Forgotten Harvest

“For a community to be whole and healthy, it must be based on people’s love and concern for each other.”  – Millard Fuller

Workers load produce for distribution.

Forgotten Harvest has been a part of the Southeast Michigan community for 25 years. They provide food to the hungry throughout the area with support from over 800 grocers, food distributors, farms, and dairies. The food rescue operation takes perfectly good perishable foods like meat, dairy, vegetables, fruits and breads, and delivers them free of charge to food banks. The Oak Park based non-profit rescues food in the morning and distributes that food in the afternoon to 280 agencies in the area, six days a week. This year alone, Forgotten Harvest’s 35 trucks have rescued more than 48.8 million pounds of food. Continue reading